Withdrawal Agreement Good Friday Agreement

The Irish government supported this proposal. [48] It was strongly rejected by the Democratic Unionist Party as a weakening of Northern Ireland`s place in the UK and is seen as the main reason why Theresa May`s withdrawal agreement was never approved by the British Parliament. [49] The British government had rejected the original proposal. But if they do not reach an agreement before the end of the transition period, on December 31, 2020, and if there is no free trade agreement, some of this new bill could come into play. The agreement consists of two related documents, both agreed on Good Friday, 10 April 1998 in Belfast: issues of sovereignty, civil and cultural rights, decommissioning of arms, demilitarisation, justice and police were at the heart of the agreement. The agreement reaffirmed its commitment to « mutual respect, civil rights and religious freedoms for all within the Community. » The multi-party agreement recognized « the importance of respect, understanding and tolerance with regard to linguistic diversity, » particularly with regard to the Irish language, Ulster Scots and the languages of other ethnic minorities in Northern Ireland, « all of which are part of the cultural richness of the Island of Ireland. » The EU-UK withdrawal agreement came into force on 1 February 2020. The Northern Ireland Protocol (the « Protocol ») was part of the agreement. The protocol provides for the application of a long list of certain provisions of EU legislation, including tariff and aid or subsidy laws, to the trade and regulatory regime for goods in Northern Ireland, in order to maintain the smooth functioning of trade between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, without customs infrastructure between the two products. The desire to avoid the creation of an effective border in Ireland and to jeopardise the outcome of the Belfast/Good Friday agreement was an essential element at the basis of the protocol. The British government is virtually out of the game and neither parliament nor the British people have, as part of this agreement, the legal right to obstruct the achievement of Irish unity if it had the consent of the people of the North and The South…